Young age at diagnosis tied to poorer breast cancer outcomes

  • Szollár A & al.
  • Eur J Surg Oncol
  • 5 juin 2019

  • Par Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Résumés d'articles
L'accès à l'intégralité du contenu de ce site est reservé uniquement aux professionnels de santé disposant d'un compte. L'accès à l'intégralité du contenu de ce site est reservé uniquement aux professionnels de santé disposant d'un compte.

Takeaway

  • Breast cancer in very young (aged ≤35 years) vs young (aged 36-45 years) patients is biologically more aggressive and tied to poorer survival.

Why this matters

  • Very young patients merit their own subgroup for clinical trials and further research.

Study design

  • Retrospective cohort with breast cancer (n=598) of the National Institute of Oncology, Hungary (2000-2014).
  • 297 patients were very young; 301 patients were young.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Median follow-up for very young patients was 69 months; that for young women was 79 months.
  • The very young vs young patients were more likely to:
    • have triple-negative breast cancer (31% vs 16.9%; P=.00008),
    • have estrogen receptor-negative cancer (8.4% vs 7.3%; P=.00008),
    • have distant metastasis at diagnosis (3% vs 0.3%; P=.01), and
    • receive chemotherapy (73.5% vs 66.7%; P=.049).
  • Very young vs young patients were less likely to receive endocrine therapy (57% vs 65.7%; P=.037).
  • No differences between groups in rates of radiotherapy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy.
  • Very young patients had worse DFS (P=.00004) and OS (P=.00005) than young patients.

Limitations

  • Lack of information on behavioral risk factors.
  • Low rate of BRCA testing.
  • Not clear whether cohort is multicenter or single center.