Poor metabolic health tied to CRN risk, regardless of BMI

  • Kim NH & al.
  • Dig Dis Sci
  • 9 août 2018

  • Par Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Résumés d'articles
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Takeaway

  • Men with metabolic abnormalities have a higher risk for colorectal neoplasia (CRN), whether they are obese or not.

Why this matters

  • Poor metabolic health should be considered a risk factor for colorectal cancer in men.

Study design

  • 139,023 asymptomatic adults underwent colonoscopy.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • 34.5% of men and 61.4% of women were metabolically healthy nonobese (MHNO); 6.2% of men and 2.5% of women were metabolically healthy obese (MHO); 23.5% of men and 21.6% of women were metabolically unhealthy nonobese (MUNO); and 35.8% of men and 14.5% of women were metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO).
  • CRN incidence highest in MUNO men (21.8%) and MUO women (17.1%) and lowest in MHNO (13.6% men, 8.6% women).
  • Compared with MHNO group, overall CRN risk in men significantly increased in MHO (aOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.12-1.33) and MUNO groups (aOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.18-1.31) and was highest in MUO group (aOR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.40-1.54); risk for advanced CRN significantly higher in MUNO (aOR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.002-1.33) and MUO (aOR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.31-1.70).
  • Compared with MHNO group, CRN risk in women significantly increased only in MUO (aOR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.21-1.47).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study with an all-South Korean cohort.