Gallstones slightly increase CRC risk in women in large European cohort

  • Ward HA & al.
  • Int J Cancer
  • 26 déc. 2018

  • de Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Résumé d’articles
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Takeaway

  • A history of gallstones may slightly increase the onset of colorectal cancer (CRC), but only in women, according to a large prospective cohort from 10 European countries.

Why this matters

  • Findings warrant confirmation.

Study design

  • Prospective cohort of 334,986 participants (ages 25-70 years) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).
  • Gallstones were defined as self-reported history of gallstone diagnosis.
  • Incident CRC was identified from cancer registries in 7 countries and by insurance records and active follow-up in 3.
  • Funding: European Commission; International Agency for Research on Cancer.

Key results

  • Gallstones were self-reported at baseline by 3917 men and 19,836 women.
  • At mean follow-up of 13.6 years, incident CRC was diagnosed in 1832 men and 2178 women.
  • Upon stratified analysis, women with gallstones had a 14% increased risk of developing CRC (HR, 1.14; P=.077), after adjustments for BMI, diabetes, alcohol intake, and physical activity.
  • Men with gallstones had a nonsignificantly reduced risk of developing CRC (HR, 0.81; P=.10).
  • The HR for women was not significantly altered by additional adjustment for reproductive history or waist circumference.
  • Median age at diagnosis of gallstones was not associated with incident CRC.

Limitations

  • Observational design.
  • No verification of gallstones in medical records.